6 Biggest Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make

The motivation for starting a business can vary greatly. For some it is about escaping corporate life, for others it is about maximizing income, and yet for others it’s about a more creative expression. Whatever the reasons for starting a business there are certain truths I’ve come to understand that effect all startups across the board to one extent or another.

1. Startups fail to spend money intelligently on marketing.

Many new business owners fail to maximize a return on their marketing investment. For instance, buying advertising space is often, at least for most businesses, money thrown out the window, especially if it is not placed properly. Advertising helps with brand recognition so yes, it has value. But for most startups a better way to spend money is to build relationships with centers of influence and to get found online. The easiest way to accomplish those goals is to pump money into your website, maximize the search engine optimization, and join networking groups and associations that see your company as an asset.

2. Startups fail to spend money on viable resources.

Piggybacking off the prior criticism of startups, many business owners try to cut costs wherever possible. However, as the saying goes, sometimes spending money is the only way to make money and break past the financial plateaus that most startups face. So the question is, where do you spend money? The answer is simple … in people that can perform the services that take away from your time building business, networking, or performing more meaningful/expert tasks. As a business owner, I don’t spend my time doing bookkeeping or taxes, or developing my website. Instead, I pay people to perform those services so that I can spend my time focusing on building relationships and networking. Even when it comes to more menial tasks, hiring a part time associate to perform those tasks ends up leaving room for more productive things.

3. Companies fail to set a standard for the target client they want to attract.

I see this all too often especially with those in the service industry. Don’t just take on any and all clients you can. Sometimes, a client will cost you more time and money then they are worth. Set a standard for who you want as your target/ideal client, and mold your services and fee structure to cater to that type of client.

4. As a business owner, simply failing to take care of yourself.

If you can’t take care of yourself, you can’t take care of others. When you lose sleep, don’t eat well, don’t exercise, get too stressed, your work product is the first to feel the impact. How you live gets reflected in your daily presentation. Failing to take care of yourself becomes a reflection on your professionalism for certain. But more importantly, if you don’t take care of yourself, then you’re missing the point of working hard. Work-life balance is an important concept. Don’t lose focus of what is important in life. When it comes to your clients, being responsive, reliable and professional are all very important. But unless you’re walking into surgery tomorrow, client issues can wait. The key is balancing the expectations of your clients. If you don’t want to be stressed at 11:00 pm then don’t answer the phone or client email at 11:00 pm. Your personal time is about recharging and becoming fresh for the next day. Your clients will respect your boundaries and you’ll be a more fulfilled business owner.

5. Absorbing too many financial sacrifices in order to gain favor with a client.

I represented a few contractors that will especially identify with this scenario. Yes, there are times you want to discount your services in anticipation of maintaining a long term relationship. However, there’s a fine line between treating a long term client to the occasional discount and letting your clients take advantage of you. Furthermore, when you continually provide non-requested discounts, you undervalue your services. Be confident in your services and project a sense of positive self-worth. You’ll be less frustrated in your business and your clients will respect you for it.

6. Failing to accept failures as a normal part of business.

All businesses experience failures. Failures are a natural part of the business life-cycle. What’s important is that you learn from your mistakes and set a concrete plan for rectifying the issues. Dwelling over your failures is not healthy, but analyzing them and approaching them with practical approach, or the right professional, is in fact a healthy business practice.

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